To help provide a better understanding of the harsh realities of ALS, here are some cold statistics:

 

• The average life expectancy after an ALS diagnosis is 3–5 years.

 

• Only about half of all people with ALS live more than 3 years after diagnosis.

 

• Less than 1% of patients with ALS will have significant improvement in function lasting 12 months or more.

 

• Approximately 6,400 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with ALS each year. The incidence of ALS is two per 100,000 people, and it is estimated that more than 20,000 Americans may be living with ALS at any given time.

 

• ALS occurs throughout the world with no racial, ethnic or socioeconomic boundaries and can affect anyone. 

 

• Military veterans are approximately twice as likely to develop ALS. 

 

90–95% of ALS cases are sporadic and can affect anyone seemingly out of nowhere. 

5–10% of ALS cases are familial and passed down from generation to generation. ALS patients with the genetic deformation of familial ALS have a 50% chance of passing the disease on to each of their offspring.

 

But the quickest way to understand what makes ALS such an urgent concern is this statistic:

 

• ALS is 0% survivable.

 

ALS has no known cause. No effective treatment. And no cure. It’s fatal in 100% of all cases.

That’s the reason we’re asking you to donate to the ALSA Wisconsin Chapter on Giving Tuesday (December 1st). With your help, we can continue the research that will one day lead to a statistics-altering breakthrough. We’re 100% sure of it.

ALS ASSOCIATION WISCONSIN CHAPTER  •  3333 NORTH MAYFAIR ROAD, SUITE 104  •  WAUWATOSA, WI 53222-2319  •  414.763.2220

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